Welcome to North Carolina Next Generation Network

North Carolina Next Generation Network (NCNGN) is a regional initiative focused on stimulating the deployment of next generation broadband networks in North Carolina. The coordinated effort is led by six municipalities and four leading research universities and supported by local Chambers of Commerce and businesses in the Research Triangle and Piedmont regions. NCNGN’s goal is to encourage private sector providers to deliver ultra-fast bandwidth at highly affordable prices to ensure our regions and state remain competitive and at the forefront of developing the next-generation applications essential to all sectors of the economy.

On February 1, 2013, NCNGN, through the Triangle J Council of Governments, issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) inviting one or more private companies to build and operate the desired networks. On April 8th, 2014, the Steering Committee of the North Carolina Next Generation Network (NCNGN) unanimously and enthusiastically approved a resolution recommending that its members seek authorization to enter master network development agreements with AT&T.


NCNGN Welcomes Google to the Triangle!

January 27, 2015 – The North Carolina Next Generation Network (NCNGN) welcomes today’s announcement by Google Fiber. The 10 municipalities and universities that comprise NCNGN are excited that Google will join AT&T in deploying gigabit service in central North Carolina. Competition among providers is key to expanding access to competitively priced high speed broadband services that our citizens and business need to thrive in the new economy.

Strong leadership and countless hours of work by dedicated municipal staff have begun to transform the broadband landscape. One year ago, residential customers in the Triangle and Piedmont-Triad could not subscribe to any broadband service faster than 50 Mbps. Today’s announcement means many residents in Carrboro, Cary, Chapel Hill, Durham, and Raleigh will soon be able to choose from at least two providers offering gigabit service. Residents in Winston-Salem, Morrisville, and Garner will have gigabit service available from at least one provider. Beyond giving residents the option for broadband speeds 100 times faster than the average speed that consumers use today, competition among providers should help lower prices even for consumers who subscribe to slower broadband speeds.

NCNGN looks forward to continuing our collaboration and engaging the community to increase digital inclusion and support application development efforts that will take advantage of these next generation networks. We will also continue to work with all interested local providers on plans to provide citizens with competitively priced access to broadband.